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About Michael ::. 'Vitiligo'


Michael Jackson has a skin disorder called 'Vitiligo'!
This banal physiological disorder causes a depigmentation of the skin causing blotchy white patches. Often there is a family tendency to develop the condition. Two people in every 100 suffer from this condition, so Michael is definitely not alone.
'Vitiligo' can occur at any stage in life, and Michael has mentioned that he first noticed that he had the disorder when he was in his 20's.

Because of his 'Vitiligo' Michael Jackson cannot go out into the sun.

He has said that he is completely allergic to the sun, and that he really isn't even supposed to go outside at all.
By wearing the silk face mask, along with long sleeved clothing, pants, sunglasses and his fedora Michael can go outside and enjoy himself just as everyone else can.

He has NEVER bleached his skin or tried to make his skin lighter.
All rumors saying that he has done this, are simply not true!


He has tried to even out the blotches on his skin by using make up to cover them up! That is the reason why he is using so much cosmetics.

Source: [EMJ, 'The Family Medical Guide', 'Michael Jackson Talks to Oprah', The 'Vitiligo' Society website UK,
MJ - 'VH1' and 'Simulchat' interviews]

You can log on to the 'Vitiligo' Society website by visiting
www.vitiligosociety.org.uk to find out more about this disorder.
 
What Is 'Vitiligo'?

'Vitiligo' (vit-ill-EYE-go) is a pigmentation disorder in which melanocytes (the cells that make pigment) in the skin, the mucous membranes (tissues that
line the inside of the mouth and nose and genital and rectal areas), and the retina (inner layer of the eyeball) are destroyed. As a result, white patches
of skin appear on different parts of the body.
The hair that grows in areas affected by 'Vitiligo' usually turns white.

The cause of 'Vitiligo' is not known, but doctors and researchers have several different theories. One theory is that people develop antibodies that destroy the melanocytes in their own bodies. Another theory is that melanocytes destroy themselves.

Finally, some people have reported that a single event such as sunburn or emotional distress triggered 'vitiligo'; however, these events have not been scientifically proven to cause 'Vitiligo'.

Who Is Affected by 'Vitiligo'?

About 1 to 2 percent of the world's population, or 40 to 50 million people, have 'Vitiligo'. In the United States, 2 to 5 million people have the disorder. Ninety-five percent of people who have 'Vitiligo' develop it before their 40th birthday. The disorder affects all races and both sexes equally.

'Vitiligo' seems to be more common in people with certain autoimmune diseases (diseases in which a person's immune system reacts against the body's own organs or tissues). These autoimmune diseases include hyperthyroidism (an overactive thyroid gland), adrenocortical insufficiency (the adrenal gland does not produce enough of the hormone called corticosteroid), alopecia areata (patches of baldness), and pernicious anemia (a low level of red blood cells caused by failure of the body to absorb vitamin B-12). Scientists do not know the reason for the association between 'vitiligo' and these autoimmune diseases. However, most people with 'vitiligo' have no other autoimmune disease.

'Vitiligo' may also be hereditary, that is, it can run in families. Children whose parents have the disorder are more likely to develop 'vitiligo'. However, most children will not get 'vitiligo' even if a parent has it, and most people with vitiligo do not have a family history of the disorder.

What Are the Symptoms of Vitiligo?

People who develop 'Vitiligo' usually first notice white patches (depigmentation) on their skin. These patches are more common in sun-exposed areas, including the hands, feet, arms, face, and lips. Other common areas for white patches to appear are the armpits and groin and around the mouth, eyes, nostrils, navel, and genitals.

'Vitiligo' generally appears in one of three patterns. In one pattern (focal pattern), the depigmentation is limited to one or only a few areas. Some people develop depigmented patches on only one side of their bodies (segmental pattern). But for most people who have 'vitiligo', depigmentation occurs on different parts of the body (generalized pattern). In addition to white patches on the skin, people with vitiligo may have premature graying of the scalp hair, eyelashes, eyebrows, and beard. People with dark skin may notice a loss of color inside their mouths.

Will the Depigmented Patches Spread?

There is no way to predict if 'vitiligo' will spread. For some people, the depigmented patches do not spread. The disorder is usually progressive, however, and over time the white patches will spread to other areas of the body. For some people, 'vitiligo' spreads slowly, over many years. For other people, spreading occurs rapidly. Some people have reported additional depigmentation following periods of physical or emotional stress.

How Is Vitiligo Diagnosed?

If a doctor suspects that a person has 'vitiligo', he or she usually begins by asking the person about his or her medical history. Important factors in a person's medical history are a family history of vitiligo; a rash, sunburn, or other skin trauma at the site of 'vitiligo' 2 to 3 months before depigmentation started; stress or physical illness; and premature (before age 35) graying of the hair. In addition, the doctor will need to know whether the patient or anyone in the patient's family has had any autoimmune diseases and whether the patient is very sensitive to the sun. The doctor will then examine the patient to rule out other medical problems. The doctor may take a small sample (biopsy) of the affected skin. He or she may also take a blood sample to check the blood-cell count and thyroid function. For some patients, the doctor may recommend an eye examination to check for uveitis (inflammation of part of the eye). A blood test to look for the presence of antinuclear antibodies (a type of autoantibody) may also be done. This test helps determine if the patient has another autoimmune disease.

How Can People Cope With the Emotional and Psychological Aspects of Vitiligo?

The change in appearance caused by 'vitiligo' can affect a person's emotional and psychological well-being and may create difficulty in getting or keeping a job. People with this disorder can experience emotional stress, particularly if vitiligo develops on visible areas of the body, such as the face, hands, arms, feet, or on the genitals. Adolescents, who are often particularly concerned about their appearance, can be devastated by widespread 'vitiligo'. Some people who have 'vitiligo' feel embarrassed, ashamed, depressed, or worried about how others will react.

Several strategies can help a person cope with vitiligo. First, it is important to find a doctor who is knowledgeable about vitiligo and takes the disorder seriously. The doctor should also be a good listener and be able to provide emotional support. Patients need to let their doctors know if they are feeling depressed because doctors and other mental health professionals can help people deal with depression. Patients should also learn as much as possible about the disorder and treatment choices so that they can participate in making important decisions about medical care.

Talking with other people who have vitiligo may also help a person cope. The National Vitiligo Foundation can provide information about vitiligo and refer people to local chapters that have support groups of patients, families, and physicians. Family and friends are another source of support.

Some people with vitiligo have found that cosmetics that cover the white patches improve their appearance and help them feel better about themselves. A person may need to experiment with several brands of concealing cosmetics before finding the product that works best.


What Treatment Options Are Available?


The goal of treating 'vitiligo' is to restore the function of the skin and to improve the patient's appearance. Therapy for 'vitiligo' takes a long time it usually must be continued for 6 to 18 months. The choice of therapy depends on the number of white patches and how widespread they are and on the patient's preference for treatment. Each patient responds differently to therapy, and a particular treatment may not work for everyone. Current treatment options for 'vitiligo' include medical, surgical, and adjunctive therapies (therapies that can be used along with surgical or medical treatments).

Cosmetics


Some patients with 'vitiligo' cover depigmented patches with stains, makeup, or self-tanning lotions. These cosmetic products can be particularly effective for people whose vitiligo is limited to exposed areas of the body. Dermablend, Lydia O'Leary, Clinique, Fashion Flair, Vitadye, and Chromelin offer makeup or dyes that patients may find helpful for covering up depigmented patches.

Counseling and Support Groups

Many people with 'Vitiligo' find it helpful to get counseling from a mental health professional. People often find they can talk to their counselor about issues that are difficult to discuss with anyone else. A mental health counselor can also offer patients support and help in coping with vitiligo. In addition, it may be helpful to attend a vitiligo support group.

What Research Is Being Done on Vitiligo?

For more than a decade, research on how melanocytes play a role in vitiligo has greatly increased. This includes research on autologous melanocyte transplants. At the University of Colorado, NIAMS supports a large collaborative project involving families with 'Vitiligo' in the United States and the United Kingdom.

To date, over 2,400 patients are involved. It is hoped that genetic analysis of these families will uncover the location and possibly the specific gene or genes--conferring susceptibility to the disease. Doctors and researchers continue to look for the causes of and new treatments for 'Vitiligo'.




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